Did You Know? The Crane’s Mill Campus is a Certified Wildlife Habitat

Crane’s Mill is a Certified Wildlife Habitat. Here’s more on that certification, and what it means to our residents.

We are proud to share that Crane’s Mill is a Certified Wildlife Habitat. We have signs posted on our campus that read:

Crane's Mill is a Certified Wildlife Habitat

Crane’s Mill is a Certified Wildlife Habitat

“This habitat is certified in the National Wildlife Federation’s worldwide network of mini-refuges. Because of the owner’s conscientious planning, landscaping, and sustainable gardening, wildlife may find quality habitat.”

To be classified as a Certified Wildlife Habitat, the Crane’s mill campus has to continually provide the four basic basic habitat elements needed for wildlife to thrive: food, water, cover, and places to raise young.

It’s a wonderful sight for our resident to look out their windows towards the woods surrounding our campus. They get to see untouched, serene, natural land that is home to an array of birds, wild turkeys, deer, and so much more.

During migration periods, all sorts of colorful feathered friends can be seen stopping over at Crane’s Mill on their way to their seasonal homes and families of deer bound happily in West Essex Park (our neighbor directly to the west of our pond).

Our resident trail walking group goes out every Friday morning to tour the woods, and after hiking with a watchful eye, they report back on their latest findings.

In fact, the group (led by experienced trail keeper Mike Mazur) sometimes brings their camera along—they shared these 100 nature photos from on and around campus—click this link to see more…enjoy!

The Morris – Two Bedroom with Den – Now Available

Join us for a tour of the “Morris” two bedroom deluxe apartment!

Just last week we snapped a few photos of one of our “Morris” apartment homes to share with visitors to our site. One of 21 available floor plans, the Morris is located in our Sycamore building and is just steps from Towne Square. The 1,111 square foot apartment features two large bedrooms complete with two walk-in closets, two full baths, an open living/dining space, well-appointed kitchen and more.

Like all Crane’s Mill homes, the Morris boasts a private, screened-in porch and outdoor storage area along with an in-unit washer and dryer.

You can view the gallery below, and be sure to also take a look at the Morris floor plan for ideas on how you might decorate each spacious room.

Interested in learning more? Call 973-276-6700 or click here to visit our contact page. We look forward to hearing from you!

Join Us for An “Apartment Spotlight” – Thursday, July 26th

For one day only, Crane’s Mill is shining the spotlight on some of its most desirable independent senior living apartments.

The Morris Floor Plan - 2 bedroom, 2 bath with den, one of three featured apartment homes.

The Morris Floor Plan – 2 bedroom, 2 bath with den, one of three featured apartment homes.

You’re invited to tour three distinct, move-in ready homes and have your questions answered at this special event.

We have a limited number of completely renovated apartment homes. Each one is available for immediate occupancy or to customize to your specific wants and needs, providing everything you desire in a brand-new space with the warmth and comfort of home.

Thursday, July 26
10:00 a.m. – 12:00 Noon

RSVP today! Call 973-298-4060 or click here to send an email.

History of The Caldwells

We stumbled upon the fine website of the First Baptist Church of Bloomfield, which features this incredible page of history on The Caldwells.

You can visit the page by clicking here.

Among our favorite photos include Bloomfield Avenue, The Monomonock Inn, and of course the Crane House. The “Denver of the East” never looked so good!

These fantastic photos got us thinking about the history of our own property. Crane’s Mill was originally built by Caleb Hatfield in the 1780s. The land and mill were purchased by Samuel Crane, and the mill was run by his family. Four of Crane’s grandsons (Nathaniel, Moses, Zenas, and Asher) rebuilt the mill after it was destroyed by fire in 1851.

In 1955, Herbert Crane, Asher’s grandson, took over the mill and operated it until his death in 1967. At that time, the mill ceased operation after serving the region for more than two centuries. Besides the milling of lumber, Crane’s Mill was also used to grind feed and flour. Waste wood was sold for cooking and heating. Even the sawdust was used to insulate local ice houses. Many older local buildings have framing timbers cut at the mill from the once-abundant virgin forests of the area.

The old mill wheel now stands silent in Allaire State Park in Monmouth County, where it is slated for restoration.

What are some of your memories of the Caldwell area? We’d love to hear–send us an email by clicking here. We may just share your thoughts in a future post.