You’re Invited!

Visit Crane’s Mill for a very special holiday event, showcasing everything you need to know about our continuing care retirement community!

You're invited to toast the holidays and learn about Crane's Mill at our first ever Tinsel Taste & Talk event!

How much does it cost to live at Crane’s Mill? What kind of contract types are available? What about refund options? Flexible meal plan? Apartment and cottage availability? What is a Continuing Care Retirement Community? What’s the difference between Assisted Living and Independent Living?

You’ll learn about all of that and so much more at our first ever Tinsel Taste & Talk event! The Crane’s Mill team will present an informative program about Crane’s Mill and answer your questions, all against the backdrop of our wonderfully decorated community. Plus, we’re serving holiday desserts that you will not want to miss!

Seating for this event is very limited. Please call 973-276-3070 to reserver your spot, or click here to send us an email.

We look forward to seeing you at the event!

Crane’s Mill Retirement Community Hosted Fall Cooking Demo

Northern New Jersey’s premier senior living community provided a step-by-step taste of a delicious assortment of autumn-inspired dishes.

Gourmet food at a retirement community … at Crane’s Mill, that’s not marketing-speak—it’s par for the course. Executive Chef Peter Day crafts, and continuously reinvents, mouth-watering menus for Crane’s Mill residents on a daily basis.

Today, residents and guests got a taste of Thanksgiving, with modern takes on appetizers, side dishes and dessert, along with a main course served to provide a great new way to use those leftovers.

Chef Peter took center stage for a television-style cooking show, complete with a sous chef and server to round out his team. The demo was interactive from the first moment, as attendees asked questions, saw the action on the overhead big screen, and sampled each course.

Here’s a look at the menu along with some tips and pics from the event. Bon appetit!

Crab Stuffed Mushroom with Mustard Cream Sauce
Crabmeat provided a sweet, decadent, and perfectly seasoned filling for an earthy silver dollar mushroom, with a touch of silky mustard cream sauce. Chef Peter says: Crab is delicate, don’t overpower with flavors, but use seasoning to complement and bring out natural sweetness. Also, clean mushrooms with a brush or paper towel, not water, as the mushrooms will absorb the liquid.

Butternut Squash and Pear Soup
Rich, hot, seasonal soup with complex nutty flavors—perfect for freezing to reheat on a chilly winter’s eve. Chef Peter shared an effortless way to peel ginger—use a spoon to scrape the outside. Who knew it could be so easy!

Rutabaga
Maple syrup and rosemary roasted rutabaga—sweet and savory with a bit if a bite. This root vegetable can be difficult to cut, so Chef Peter suggests opting for the pre-cut variety. Though slightly more expensive, it’s widely available this time of year and is handy to save time and potential nicks with the knife.

Cauliflower with Gruyere and Bacon
An unctuous and surprisingly simple treatment for a familiar favorite. Guests were oohing and ahhing at how just a little bacon and cheese could turn this vegetable into a standout side.

Turkey Cacciatore
A tasty, rustic solution for leftover turkey—tomato sauce married with turkey stock, peppers, and mushrooms, served over spaghetti. A creative way to take leftover turkey from run of the mill to exciting and fun! Guests learned an easy trick to de-rib a green bell pepper—cut the pepper in half and hollow it out with two fingers. It’s easy and very effective!

Pumpkin Mousse
A cloud-like mousse capped the afternoon like a sweet taste of autumn … complete with a candied pecan for a bit of crunch!

If you’re interested in recipes, the Crane’s Mill Courier has you covered! Click here to send us an email and we’ll make sure to pass them along.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crane’s Mill Health Center Receives Praise from Resident’s Family

The Health Center at Crane’s Mill, offering assisted living, skilled nursing, memory care, and sub-acute rehabilitation, received another touching letter from a resident’s family.

We recently received the following letter from a Crane’s Mill resident’s family and are happy to present it to you here. For more testimonials from our residents and their families, you can visit the Crane’s Mill Reviews Page on our website.

My wife and I want to convey our sincere thanks to the staff at the Health Center at Crane’s Mill. Our aunt, Julia, moved into the Crane’s Mill retirement community in 2011 as an independent resident. She spent more than a year in that vibrant setting. She enjoyed many of the activities and social interactions.

In September of 2012, she was admitted to the skilled nursing unit at the Health Center at Crane’s Mill where she spent the last 13 months of her life. During that time, she was treated with professionalism, kindness, caring, and respect. Her primary care nursing assistant, Betty, always had her clean, well-groomed, and showed a true concern for her.

Laurel Fastow, the social worker, organized care plan meetings, and always kept us, her family, updated on her condition and her needs in a professional and knowledgable manner. In fact, the entire nursings staff—the nurses, the nursing assistants and other caregivers were very compassionate, understanding, and interested in our aunt’s condition.

When Aunt Julia passed away last month, we were comforted that she received the best care, and we would recommend Crane’s Mill to anyone. Thank you.

VICTOR and ELIZABETH K.
Wayne, New Jersey

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month

The Crane’s Mill Courier is proud to share an inspiring true-life Alzheimer’s account along with some valuable information and helpful resources.

Oftentimes, Alzheimer’s Disease can seem mysterious and scary. That’s why it’s important to note each November as Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month. During this month, there are many programs and initiatives aimed at providing information to caregivers and loved ones, and further shedding light on this disease.

They say “knowledge is power”, and that rings doubly true when it comes to the health and well-being of ourselves and our loved ones. In that spirit, we are happy to share with you these links that provide a great amount of helpful information on Alzheimer’s Disease:

Alzheimer’s Association – learn more about Awareness Month events, caregiver support programs, and honor a caregiver.

Alzheimer’s Disease Fact Sheet – presented by the National Institute on Aging; includes information, videos, and further resources.

Plus, Barbara Davey, published author and Director of Community Relations at Crane’s Mill, has shared a heartwarming and insightful reflection on Alzheimer’s Disease. Titled “Teaspooned Victories”, this story appears alongside a collection of inspiring tales in the recently published book A Cup of Comfort for Families Touched by Alzheimer’s:

If I were to describe my grandmother, adjectives like “industrious,” hardworking,” and “productive” would come to mind. Born in 1901, she had witnessed two world wars, survived the Great Depression, and managed to provide a college education for her four children by working in a factory. She had accomplished all this before I made my entrance into this world in 1956. No Wonder I had never seen my grandmother idle; she had no time! The few occasions I can remember her seated in the “parlor,” she was busy, her workbasket at her side. There were always socks to be darned, skirts to be hemmed, and tablecloths to be mended. Even while relaxing, she worked, often with a rabbit-eared, black-and-white television tuned to a Sunday night program for company.

What an ultimate irony that such an active, productive woman should spend the last years of her life completely idle—first sitting in a wheelchair; then, lying in a hospital bed … initially, confused and frustrated, later, listless and vacant. Gram where are you? I remember silently asking. What happened to that vibrant, active woman, and who is this shell that had been left behind? Continue reading